Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – 2.5 Inch to 10.5 Inch Telescopes

Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – 2.5 Inch to 10.5 Inch Telescopes is an ingenious new way to easily focus a telescope.  Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer, created this simple, very intuitive method and the device has universally been named after him: The Bahtinov Mask.

Adjustable Bahtinov focus mask for telescopes with dew shield or front end diameter vary to model.

Attach a camera to the telescope, center a fairly bright star and achieve rough focus. Then place the mask over the front aperture of your telescope by “hanging” it on the plastic screws from the front dew shield. Take a short exposure. The image of the star will show diffraction spikes. The “center” set will most likely be shifted to one side or the other. This is showing the defocus.

Adjust the focus of the telescope and re-expose the star, once again showing the diffraction spike pattern. Iterate the process until the central diffraction spike is centered against the star and the other spikes. When a symmetrical pattern is achieved, the best possible focus is then reached.  Simply remove the mask, center the target object and take amazing, sharp images!

Farpoint manufactures this “lifesaving” astrophotography tool out of virtually indestructible ABS plastic, which comes in two major types and in a range of sizes. In addition to Bahtinov masks for telescopes, Farpoint also makes Bahtinov masks for DSLR camera lenses.

 Farpoint Bahtinov Masks Are one of the best tools for manually focusing your telescope available to astrophotographers. In 2005, Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer detailed a new way to easily focus your DSLR, CMOS or CCD camera for astrophotography by adding a mask that matches the diameter of your telescope.

Bahtinov mask are a less expensive method of getting focus on objects in the night sky compared to a standard motor focuser.

With the right mask and setup it’s easy to get crystal clear focus on a star in less than 90 seconds.

mask_demo

How it Works
The slits in the mask are the focus assist, when the star is in focus it will appear on your screen display as an “X” with a line through the center (see above).

These masks will work equally as well on the end of a scope or on the end of a dew shield on top of that the mask itself does not need to be perfected centered on the scope this is due to the angle of the slits themselves.

Select a bright star, this will be your guiding object. Place the Bahtinov focusing mask on your telescope’s lens and secure it into place using the provided rubber tabs.

The slits in the mask design create a set of diffraction spikes on the star that will assist in the accuracy of our focus. It will appear on your DSLR display screen or computer as an “X” with a line through the center (when in focus). As you adjust the focuser of your telescope, the central spike will move in and out of the X-pattern. If you are using capture software be sure to compensate for the lag time between exposures on the screen, typically 4-5 seconds.

The same process applies using Live view display on your DSLR camera. The image will be much dimmer, as you are essentially looking at a live video feed rather than a short image exposure.

test

The diffraction spike pattern from a bright star using a Bahtinov mask


FP414-1

Farpoint Bahtinov Mask – Celestron 14 SCT (Hyperstar/Fastar)

$48.00 plus shipping


Farpoint Bahtinov Mask – Celestron 14 SCT (Hyperstar/Fastar) is an ingenious new way to easily focus a telescope.  Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer, created this simple, very intuitive method and the device has universally been named after him: The Bahtinov Mask.

Adjustable Bahtinov Focus Mask for Celestron 14″ SCT with Fastar or Hyperstar.

Attach a camera to the telescope, center a fairly bright star and achieve rough focus. Then place the mask over the front aperture of your telescope by “hanging” it on the plastic screws from the front dew shield. Take a short exposure. The image of the star will show diffraction spikes. The “center” set will most likely be shifted to one side or the other. This is showing the defocus.

Adjust the focus of the telescope and re-expose the star, once again showing the diffraction spike pattern. Iterate the process until the central diffraction spike is centered against the star and the other spikes. When a symmetrical pattern is achieved, the best possible focus is then reached.  Simply remove the mask, center the target object and take amazing, sharp images!

Farpoint manufactures this “lifesaving” astrophotography tool out of virtually indestructible ABS plastic, which comes in two major types and in a range of sizes. In addition to Bahtinov masks for telescopes, Farpoint also makes Bahtinov masks for DSLR camera lenses.

Bahtinov Masks Are one of the best tools for manually focusing your telescope available to astrophotographers. In 2005, Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer detailed a new way to easily focus your DSLR, CMOS or CCD camera for astrophotography by adding a mask that matches the diameter of your telescope.

Bahtinov mask are a less expensive method of getting focus on objects in the night sky compared to a standard motor focuser.

With the right mask and setup it’s easy to get crystal clear focus on a star in less than 90 seconds.

mask_demo
test

The diffraction spike pattern from a bright star using a Bahtinov mask

How it Works
The slits in the mask are the focus assist, when the star is in focus it will appear on your screen display as an “X” with a line through the center (see above).

These masks will work equally as well on the end of a scope or on the end of a dew shield on top of that the mask itself does not need to be perfected centered on the scope this is due to the angle of the slits themselves.

Select a bright star, this will be your guiding object. Place the Bahtinov focusing mask on your telescope’s lens and secure it into place using the provided rubber tabs.

The slits in the mask design create a set of diffraction spikes on the star that will assist in the accuracy of our focus. It will appear on your DSLR display screen or computer as an “X” with a line through the center (when in focus). As you adjust the focuser of your telescope, the central spike will move in and out of the X-pattern. If you are using capture software be sure to compensate for the lag time between exposures on the screen, typically 4-5 seconds.

The same process applies using Live view display on your DSLR camera. The image will be much dimmer, as you are essentially looking at a live video feed rather than a short image exposure.


Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – Meade ASA10

$30.00 Plus Shipping


Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – Meade ASA10 is an ingenious new way to easily focus a telescope.  Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer, created this simple, very intuitive method and the device has universally been named after him: The Bahtinov Mask.

Attach a camera to the telescope, center a fairly bright star and achieve rough focus. Then place the mask over the front aperture of your telescope by “hanging” it on the plastic screws from the front dew shield. Take a short exposure. The image of the star will show diffraction spikes. The “center” set will most likely be shifted to one side or the other. This is showing the defocus.

Adjust the focus of the telescope and re-expose the star, once again showing the diffraction spike pattern. Iterate the process until the central diffraction spike is centered against the star and the other spikes. When a symmetrical pattern is achieved, the best possible focus is then reached.  Simply remove the mask, center the target object and take amazing, sharp images!

Farpoint manufactures this “lifesaving” astrophotography tool out of virtually indestructible ABS plastic, which comes in two major types and in a range of sizes. In addition to Bahtinov masks for telescopes, Farpoint also makes Bahtinov masks for DSLR camera lenses.

Farpoint Bahtinov Masks Are one of the best tools for manually focusing your telescope available to astrophotographers. In 2005, Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer detailed a new way to easily focus your DSLR, CMOS or CCD camera for astrophotography by adding a mask that matches the diameter of your telescope.

Bahtinov mask are a less expensive method of getting focus on objects in the night sky compared to a standard motor focuser.

With the right mask and setup it’s easy to get crystal clear focus on a star in less than 90 seconds.

mask_demo

How it Works
The slits in the mask are the focus assist, when the star is in focus it will appear on your screen display as an “X” with a line through the center (see above).

These masks will work equally as well on the end of a scope or on the end of a dew shield on top of that the mask itself does not need to be perfected centered on the scope this is due to the angle of the slits themselves.

Select a bright star, this will be your guiding object. Place the Bahtinov focusing mask on your telescope’s lens and secure it into place using the provided rubber tabs.

The slits in the mask design create a set of diffraction spikes on the star that will assist in the accuracy of our focus. It will appear on your DSLR display screen or computer as an “X” with a line through the center (when in focus). As you adjust the focuser of your telescope, the central spike will move in and out of the X-pattern. If you are using capture software be sure to compensate for the lag time between exposures on the screen, typically 4-5 seconds.

The same process applies using Live view display on your DSLR camera. The image will be much dimmer, as you are essentially looking at a live video feed rather than a short image exposure.

test

The diffraction spike pattern from a bright star using a Bahtinov mask


FP414-1

Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – Meade ASA8

$24.00 Plus Shipping


Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – Meade ASA8 is an ingenious new way to easily focus a telescope.  Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer, created this simple, very intuitive method and the device has universally been named after him: The Bahtinov Mask.

Attach a camera to the telescope, center a fairly bright star and achieve rough focus. Then place the mask over the front aperture of your telescope by “hanging” it on the plastic screws from the front dew shield. Take a short exposure. The image of the star will show diffraction spikes. The “center” set will most likely be shifted to one side or the other. This is showing the defocus.

Adjust the focus of the telescope and re-expose the star, once again showing the diffraction spike pattern. Iterate the process until the central diffraction spike is centered against the star and the other spikes. When a symmetrical pattern is achieved, the best possible focus is then reached.  Simply remove the mask, center the target object and take amazing, sharp images!

Farpoint manufactures this “lifesaving” astrophotography tool out of virtually indestructible ABS plastic, which comes in two major types and in a range of sizes. In addition to Bahtinov masks for telescopes, Farpoint also makes Bahtinov masks for DSLR camera lenses.

Bahtinov Masks Are one of the best tools for manually focusing your telescope available to astrophotographers. In 2005, Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer detailed a new way to easily focus your DSLR, CMOS or CCD camera for astrophotography by adding a mask that matches the diameter of your telescope.

Bahtinov mask are a less expensive method of getting focus on objects in the night sky compared to a standard motor focuser.

With the right mask and setup it’s easy to get crystal clear focus on a star in less than 90 seconds.
.

mask_demo

How it Works
The slits in the mask are the focus assist, when the star is in focus it will appear on your screen display as an “X” with a line through the center (see above).

These masks will work equally as well on the end of a scope or on the end of a dew shield on top of that the mask itself does not need to be perfected centered on the scope this is due to the angle of the slits themselves.

Select a bright star, this will be your guiding object. Place the Bahtinov focusing mask on your telescope’s lens and secure it into place using the provided rubber tabs.

The slits in the mask design create a set of diffraction spikes on the star that will assist in the accuracy of our focus. It will appear on your DSLR display screen or computer as an “X” with a line through the center (when in focus). As you adjust the focuser of your telescope, the central spike will move in and out of the X-pattern. If you are using capture software be sure to compensate for the lag time between exposures on the screen, typically 4-5 seconds.

The same process applies using Live view display on your DSLR camera. The image will be much dimmer, as you are essentially looking at a live video feed rather than a short image exposure.

test

The diffraction spike pattern from a bright star using a Bahtinov mask


Farpoint 52mm-72mm Camera Filter Bahtinov Focus Mask

Seect below


Farpoint 52mm-72mm Camera Filter Bahtinov Focus Mask is an ingenious new way to easily focus your DSLR camera, webcam or CCD camera for astrophotography.  Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer, created this simple, very intuitive method and the device has universally been named after him: The Bahtinov Mask.

This Bahtinov Focus Mask snaps-in to your camera lenses that have 52mm filter threads.

The Bahtinov focus technique works best with longer focal lengths and becomes less useful with shorter focal lengths. The practical useful limit is around 100mm focal length or longer.

(Don’t confuse focal length and camera lens size).

Farpoint manufactures this “lifesaving” astrophotography tool out of virtually indestructible ABS plastic. In addition to Bahtinov masks for DSLR, webcam or CCD camera lenses, Farpoint also makes Bahtinov masks for telescopes.

BahtinovDSLR-1800dpi-1

FP413

Farpoint Bahtinov Mask – Meade 10 Inch SCT

$30.00 Plus Shipping


Farpoint Bahtinov Mask – Meade 10 Inch SCT is an ingenious new way to easily focus a telescope.  Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer, created this simple, very intuitive method and the device has universally been named after him: The Bahtinov Mask.

Adjustable Bahtinov Mask for Meade 10″ SCT

Attach a camera to the telescope, center a fairly bright star and achieve rough focus. Then place the mask over the front aperture of your telescope by “hanging” it on the plastic screws from the front dew shield. Take a short exposure. The image of the star will show diffraction spikes. The “center” set will most likely be shifted to one side or the other. This is showing the defocus.

Adjust the focus of the telescope and re-expose the star, once again showing the diffraction spike pattern. Iterate the process until the central diffraction spike is centered against the star and the other spikes. When a symmetrical pattern is achieved, the best possible focus is then reached.  Simply remove the mask, center the target object and take amazing, sharp images!

Farpoint manufactures this “lifesaving” astrophotography tool out of virtually indestructible ABS plastic, which comes in two major types and in a range of sizes. In addition to Bahtinov masks for telescopes, Farpoint also makes Bahtinov masks for DSLR camera lenses.

Bahtinov Masks Are one of the best tools for manually focusing your telescope available to astrophotographers. In 2005, Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer detailed a new way to easily focus your DSLR, CMOS or CCD camera for astrophotography by adding a mask that matches the diameter of your telescope.

Bahtinov mask are a less expensive method of getting focus on objects in the night sky compared to a standard motor focuser.

With the right mask and setup it’s easy to get crystal clear focus on a star in less than 90 seconds.

mask_demo

How it Works
The slits in the mask are the focus assist, when the star is in focus it will appear on your screen display as an “X” with a line through the center (see above).

These masks will work equally as well on the end of a scope or on the end of a dew shield on top of that the mask itself does not need to be perfected centered on the scope this is due to the angle of the slits themselves.

Select a bright star, this will be your guiding object. Place the Bahtinov focusing mask on your telescope’s lens and secure it into place using the provided rubber tabs.

The slits in the mask design create a set of diffraction spikes on the star that will assist in the accuracy of our focus. It will appear on your DSLR display screen or computer as an “X” with a line through the center (when in focus). As you adjust the focuser of your telescope, the central spike will move in and out of the X-pattern. If you are using capture software be sure to compensate for the lag time between exposures on the screen, typically 4-5 seconds.

The same process applies using Live view display on your DSLR camera. The image will be much dimmer, as you are essentially looking at a live video feed rather than a short image exposure.

test

The diffraction spike pattern from a bright star using a Bahtinov mask


Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – 6.5 Inch to 9.5 Inch Telescopes

$24.00 Plus Shipping


Farpoint Bahtinov Focus Mask – 6.5 Inch to 9.5 Inch Telescopes is an ingenious new way to easily focus a telescope.  Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer, created this simple, very intuitive method and the device has universally been named after him: The Bahtinov Mask.

Adjustable Bahtinov focus mask for telescopes with dew shield or front end diameter from 6.5″ to 9.5″.

Attach a camera to the telescope, center a fairly bright star and achieve rough focus. Then place the mask over the front aperture of your telescope by “hanging” it on the plastic screws from the front dew shield. Take a short exposure. The image of the star will show diffraction spikes. The “center” set will most likely be shifted to one side or the other. This is showing the defocus.

Adjust the focus of the telescope and re-expose the star, once again showing the diffraction spike pattern. Iterate the process until the central diffraction spike is centered against the star and the other spikes. When a symmetrical pattern is achieved, the best possible focus is then reached.  Simply remove the mask, center the target object and take amazing, sharp images!

Farpoint manufactures this “lifesaving” astrophotography tool out of virtually indestructible ABS plastic, which comes in two major types and in a range of sizes. In addition to Bahtinov masks for telescopes, Farpoint also makes Bahtinov masks for DSLR camera lenses.

Farpoint Bahtinov Masks Are one of the best tools for manually focusing your telescope available to astrophotographers. In 2005, Pavel Bahtinov, a Russian amateur telescope maker and astronomer detailed a new way to easily focus your DSLR, CMOS or CCD camera for astrophotography by adding a mask that matches the diameter of your telescope.

Bahtinov mask are a less expensive method of getting focus on objects in the night sky compared to a standard motor focuser.

With the right mask and setup it’s easy to get crystal clear focus on a star in less than 90 seconds.

mask_demo
test

How it Works
The slits in the mask are the focus assist, when the star is in focus it will appear on your screen display as an “X” with a line through the center (see above).

These masks will work equally as well on the end of a scope or on the end of a dew shield on top of that the mask itself does not need to be perfected centered on the scope this is due to the angle of the slits themselves.

Select a bright star, this will be your guiding object. Place the Bahtinov focusing mask on your telescope’s lens and secure it into place using the provided rubber tabs.

The slits in the mask design create a set of diffraction spikes on the star that will assist in the accuracy of our focus. It will appear on your DSLR display screen or computer as an “X” with a line through the center (when in focus). As you adjust the focuser of your telescope, the central spike will move in and out of the X-pattern. If you are using capture software be sure to compensate for the lag time between exposures on the screen, typically 4-5 seconds.

The same process applies using Live view display on your DSLR camera. The image will be much dimmer, as you are essentially looking at a live video feed rather than a short image exposure.

MASK

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ABOUT NELSON DEVICES

Nelson Devices is a web based company founded by Kendall Nelson, RCDD, SAA to NASA/JPL,  With a love for  Astronomy since 8 years young! 100% Veteran own bussiness, Offering a wide varity of cool gadgets and time saving devices patented by him such as the Telescope quick connect system, Slow-mo genie,  adapters, custom and aftermarket cable assemblies that somtines gets damaged, woreout or lost over time.

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Nelson Devices LLC.             Chub Lake Rd                     Roxboro, NC 27574             919561-0192                          Help.NelsonDevices@gmail.com


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